Journalist Criminally Investigated for Allegedly Using the Wrong Pronoun in Tweet

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A British Catholic journalist is being investigated by the police for allegedly “misgendering” someone in a tweet. Caroline Farrow was contacted by authorities after making an appearance on “Good Morning Britain,” in which she engaged in a debate with a transgender activist, Susie Green, who has a trans child. Following this appearance, which took place last September, Farrow allegedly referred to Green’s daughter, Jackie, by the wrong pronoun.

In a series of tweets, Farrow noted that the police had told her she would “need to be interviewed under caution for misgendering Susie Green’s child.”

Farrow pointed out that, since the police announce that they would be taking action against her, online trolls have been sending the mother of five horrific, expletive-laden and sexually violent messages. However, while the police are highly concerned about Farrow’s alleged misgendering, they appear unbothered by this onslaught of cyber abuse.

“I have done nothing wrong, nothing illegal and will happily do jail time for my right to say that people cannot change sex,” Farrow added. “I have pointed out to the police that I am a Catholic journalist/commentator and it is my religious belief that a person cannot change sex. That we are in the middle of a national conversation about what it means to be male and what it means to be female.”

Later on last night, Farrow updated her Twitter once again, summarizing the case against her. “I can’t sleep I am so furious,” she wrote. “According to the police I ‘misgendered’ which implies that I used the wrong pronouns/nouns and this potentially constitutes a criminal offence. Let that sink in.”

Following the announcement of a police investigation, Farrow said she has been “overwhelmed by media requests,” but needed to “concentrate on a parent consultation about how my son is getting on in pre-school (he has a speech delay) and tonight my daughter is singing the solo in a choral society production of Vivaldi’s Gloria & is a bag of nerves.”

What is the UK law on offensive communications?

Under the wide-ranging and wildly Malicious Communications Act 1988, it can be considered an offense to send an electronic communication which contains:

“(i) a message which is indecent or grossly offensive;

(ii) a threat; or

(iii) information which is false and known or believed to be false by the sender.”

A person who is found guilty of this offense can be subject, upon “conviction on indictment” to  “imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years or a fine (or both).” 

Having allegedly engaged in misgendering, Farrow says she is “not in breach” of this piece of legislation.

Faithwire will keep you updated as this story progresses.